Frequently Asked Questions

Sometimes it is difficult to understand how the Health Care system works so here are some answers to commonly asked questions. Please call 613-721-3467 if you would like further information.

  1. Is Access at Home Physiotherapy covered by OHIP?
  2. Do I need a doctor’s referral for in home physiotherapy?
  3. What can I expect at my first visit?
  4. How long is a visit?
  5. My mother is very frail and I am concerned that she may not tolerate a whole hour of exercise.
  6. I have had a joint replacement and the hospital said I had to attend the out patient department for on going rehab. Is that correct?
  7. My son has just been in a car accident; he is still in hospital and I am confused with the insurance coverage. Can he have physio at home?
  8. My father has Parkinson’s Disease and his balance is deteriorating. Would physiotherapy help prevent falls?
  9. My husband just had surgery on his leg and is recuperating at home. He is non weight bearing for 6 weeks and wants to return to work as soon as possible. Would physio at home help him to get on his feet faster?
  10. My mother is 90 and recovering from hip surgery. She lives in a retirement home and if she cannot become independently mobile, she may have to move to a facility with more care. Is it possible for her to get stronger at this age?

Answers...

  1. Q) Is Access at Home Physiotherapy covered by OHIP?

    A) Our services are not covered by OHIP however they are covered by most extended health care plans so please check with your carrier regarding the amount of annual coverage you have.

  2. Q) Do I need a doctor’s referral for in home physiotherapy?

    A) No, physiotherapy is a self regulated profession and you do not require a doctor’s prescription for treatment. However, many private insurance companies do require one before you can process a claim so check with your carrier for confirmation.

  3. Q) What can I expect at my first visit?

    A) The physiotherapist will sit and talk with you a short while to obtain a brief medical history to address your concerns and determine your personal goals. She will complete a functional assessment assessing any pain, strength, balance and mobility concerns. Any recent medical tests or reports will be examined and with your permission, she may contact your doctor to obtain additional medical information. If necessary, she will discuss safety issues around your home and advise on mobility or home safety equipment. Based on this assessment, active treatment will generally start during the initial visit.

  4. Q) How long is a visit?

    A) Visits are generally 45 mins to 1 hour. Occasionally MVA clients have multiple injuries and may require longer.

  5. Q) My mother is very frail and I am concerned that she may not tolerate a whole hour of exercise.

    A) When someone is frail, elderly, acutely injured or ill, they need frequent rest periods and gently focused exercise; the pace of intervention is much less. As they progress in strength and endurance, we are able to increase the number of activities, increase exercise reps and lengthen of certain activities. It is rare that we are present less than 1 hour irregardless of the diagnosis.

  6. Q) I have had a joint replacement and the hospital said I had to attend the out patient department for on going rehab. Is that correct?

    A) If you attended the hospital for ongoing physio, it would be OHIP covered But it is your decision if you would prefer to have private in home physiotherapy. We will communicate with your surgeon just as the hospital therapist would.

  7. Q) My son has just been in a car accident; he is still in hospital and I am confused with the insurance coverage. Can he have physio at home?

    A) Yes. Call you insurance company and register your claim as son as possible.Once you have a claim number, call us and we will help you navigate the system and provide your son with physio as soon as he is discharged from hospital. We can complete the disability form and communicate with the adjuster and your medial team.

  8. Q) My father has Parkinson’s Disease and his balance is deteriorating. Would physiotherapy help prevent falls?

    A) After proper medication, physiotherapy is the most important treatment for Parkinson’s Disease. It will not cure the condition but balance reactions, mobility, and flexibility can significantly improve with a personalized program.

  9. Q) My husband just had surgery on his leg and is recuperating at home. He is non weight bearing for 6 weeks and wants to return to work as soon as possible. Would physio at home help him to get on his feet faster?

    A) Weight bearing status is determined by the orthopedic surgeon and depends on the rate of healing and the type of procedure done. However, it is still possible to exercise to improve strength and flexibility at any stage of weight bearing. If he waits until the bone heals and then starts to exercise, the total rehabilitation period will be much longer. An in home exercise program during this phase of recovery will strengthen the leg, promote healing, and make him feel a lot better overall. Once he is able to increase his weight bearing, his leg could be near normal strength.

  10. Q) My mother is 90 and recovering from hip surgery. She lives in a retirement home and if she cannot become independently mobile, she may have to move to a facility with more care. Is it possible for her to get stronger at this age?

    A) Absolutely! If your mother is willing to participate in a physiotherapy program bout twice a week for several weeks, there is a very good chance she will be functioning as well as she was prior to her fall. With a good personalized exercise program people at any age can get stronger. At age 90 it may take a little longer that at 60 but it is highly probable.